news & trends

What’s the Latest Update on Canada’s Food Guide?

canada's food guide

At the annual Dietitians of Canada conference in Vancouver, Ann Ellis – Manager of Dietary Guidance Manager at Health Canada – shared the latest update on the revisions to Canada’s Food Guide. We were there and are happy to share our insights!

The current rainbow design Food Guide communicated dietary guidance with an “all-in-one” tool. The new Food Guide will include a “Suite of Resources” using different tools and resources that will all be launched throughout 2018 and 2019. These timelines are later than originally anticipated as Health Canada is waiting for the release of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2015 data.

Specifically, here’s a look at the timelines for the new Canada’s Food Guide:

In late fall 2018, Health Canada plans to launch a mobile-responsive web application to deliver Canada’s Food Guide Suite of Resources in an accessible, relevant and useful way for Canadians. This will house:

Canada’s Dietary Guidelines for Health Professionals and Policy Makers – A report providing Health Canada’s policy on healthy eating. This report will form the foundation for Canada’s Food Guide tools and resources.
Canada’s Food Guide Healthy Eating Principles – Communicating Canada’s Dietary Guidelines in plain language.
• Canada’s Food Guide Graphic – Expressing the Healthy Eating Principles through visuals and words.
Canada’s Food Guide Interactive Tool – An interactive online tool providing custom information for different life stages, in different settings.
Canada’s Food Guide Web Resources – Mobile-responsive healthy eating information (factsheets, videos, recipes) to help Canadians apply Canada’s Dietary Guidelines.

In Spring 2019, Health Canada plans to release:
Canada’s Healthy Eating Pattern for Health Professionals and Policy Makers – A report providing guidance on amounts and types of foods as well as life stage guidance.
Enhancements to Canada’s Food Guide – Interactive Tool and Canada’s Food Guide – Web Resources – Enhancements and additional content to Canada’s web application on an ongoing basis.

A few other insights:
– Health Canada is hoping to get back to an overall pattern of eating and highlight nutrients of public health concern. The new Canada’s Food Guide will also have a heavy focus on food skills and determinants to health.
– There is no intent to advise consumers to avoid meat in the new Food Guide.
– The new Food Guide will focus more on the proportionality and frequency of meals, rather than numbers of servings to consume. In other word, information about number of servings may be more “behind the scenes” info for health professionals rather than front-facing info for consumers

Sign for our free nutrition e-newsletter for more insights and we’ll keep you posted on the release of the new Canada’s Food Guide resources!

What’s the Definition of Unhealthy Food and Beverages for Children?

summer, childhood, leisure and people concept - group of happy k

On May 8, 2018, Health Canada published an updated on its proposed direction for the development of regulations to restrict marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages to children. Here’s what you need to know.

Background
In 2015, the Government of Canada made a commitment to restrict the marketing of unhealthy foods to children (M2K). In 2016, Senator Greene Raine introduced Bill S-228 –the Child Health Protection Act – which would protect children’s health by prohibiting the marketing of unhealthy food and beverages to children. This is a key element of Health Canada’s Healthy Eating Strategy, which aims to curb obesity and chronic disease among all Canadians. On June 10, 2017, Health Canada launched a 75-day public consultation.

Update on proposed direction
Bill S-228 was studied by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health from April 18 to 30, 2018. During this study, two amendments were made to the Bill:
– To define “children” as persons under the age of 13 (instead of age 17) which follows suit with the Quebec Consumer Protection Act; and
– To require Parliament to review the legislation within 5 years of the Act coming into force, particularly to assess whether the age limit of 13 years results in increased advertising to teenagers.

What’s next?
Health Canada is developing regulations to implement the proposed prohibition on the advertising of unhealthy foods and beverages to children. The approach will be modelled after Quebec where restricted marketing of all products and services to children has been in effect since the late 1970s.

The new regulations propose to define “unhealthy” food as food that exceeds the threshold for the nutrient content claims “low in sodium/salt”, “low in saturated fat”, and / or “low in sugars” OR as food that carries a front-of-package symbol (a symbol which is proposed to appear on any food that contains 15% or more Daily Value [15% DV] for sodium, saturated fat and / or sugars).

Under this proposed definition, here are examples of food that would / would not be allowed to be marketed to children:

Foods without marketing restrictions

• Vegetables or fruits (fresh, canned, frozen) without added ingredients (e.g. sodium, sugars)
• Low sodium french fries
• Peanut & nut butter, natural
• Plain nuts & seeds
• Plain fluid milk from skim to 3.25%
• Unsweetened plant-based beverages
• Yogurt (plain)
• Cereal, ready to eat, wheat, shredded
• Cereal, hot, oats, minute/quick, dry
• Plain whole grains (e.g., barley, quinoa, brown rice, oats)
• Low sodium crackers
• Low sodium breads
• Snacks (plain popcorn, low sodium chips)
• Plain pasta
• Plain legumes (e.g. beans, lentils)
• Lean cuts of meat and poultry
• Plain fish and seafood

Foods subject to marketing restrictions
• Processed meat
• Soft drink, regular
• Condiments
• Confectioneries
• Most vegetables or fruits (fresh, canned, frozen) with added ingredients (e.g. salt, sugars)
• Fruit & vegetable juices
• Regular french fries
• Peanut & nut butter, fat and sugar added
• Candied or salted nuts & seeds
• Flavoured fluid milk
• Sweetened plant-based beverages
• Most sugar-sweetened ready-to-eat breakfast cereals
• Instant sugar-sweetened oatmeal
• Most crackers
• Most breads, white and whole wheat
• Snacks (flavored popcorn, chips)
• Most muffins, brownies, cookies, cakes
• Meat & poultry breaded, coated, with sauces, etc.
• Fish & seafood breaded, coated, with sauces, etc.

Health Canada is also setting out:
– Factors to determine if an advertisement is directed at children through child-focused settings, media channels and advertising techniques; and
– Exemptions to the prohibition, such as for children’s sports sponsorship.

Later this year, Health Canada will publish the detailed regulatory proposal in Canada Gazette, Part I at which time, members of the public and interested stakeholders will have an opportunity to provide feedback. We’ll keep you posted and let you know when it’s time to voice your opinion!

International Trends

Food regulations are changing all around the globe and we’re keeping an eye on international policies that may impact your business. Click here to discover more about 3 impactful changes – USA Menu Labelling, Ireland Sugar Tax and WHO Marketing to Kids. Contact us to discuss more about these emerging trends and the connection to your business and health and wellness.

  1. USA Menu labelling goes national
Menu labelling usa N4NN news May 2018
(Image source: FDA.GOV)

USDA’s menu labelling has reached the compliance deadline.  As of May 7, 2018 USA consumers now have access to calorie and nutrition information in restaurants and similar retail food establishments that are part of a chain with 20 or more locations. This information inspired competition among producers to formulate food in ways that make it more healthful. In 2017, Ontario became the first province in Canada to include mandatory menu labelling of calories. What’s your plan to leverage the power of food? Are you using science-based attributes to make your foods healthier? We are Registered Dietitians who can help!

Source: US Food & Drug Administration, Menu Labeling Requirements and Marion Nestle PhD www.foodpolitics.com

  1. Ireland’s new sugar tax on soft drinks takes effect May 1st.
sugar tax N4NN news May 2018
(Image source Independent ie Newsdesk)

 

Irish consumers are now seeing that high-sugar drinks have become more expensive under the Sugar Sweetened Drinks Tax. The 16c tax applies to water or juice-based drinks with between 5-8g of sugar per 100ml. The soft drinks tax rises to 24c per litre for varieties with more than 8g of sugar.

The tax only applies to water and juice-based drinks with added sugar. Fruit juices and dairy products are exempt from the tax on the ground that they offer some nutritional value.

Regulators expect soft drinks companies will reformulate their products in order to avoid the tax. The move has been welcomed by the Irish Heart Foundation.  It is hoped the sugar tax will play an important role in tackling Ireland’s obesity crisis, with one in four Irish children currently overweight or obese.

Back here at home, the North West Territories is considering a sugary drink tax in 2018-2019.

Source: Independent.ie Newsdesk

  1. UN WHO weighs in against Marketing to kids

WHO M2K N4NN news May 2018 M2K N4NN news May 2018
(Image source:WHO.org & Nutrition for NON Nutritionists)

UN health officials consider plan to ‘outlaw’ fast food giants from charitable work with kids says a memo reported in the news. UK media says WHO calls for ‘stringent regulation’ to block firms, such as KFC and McDonalds from marketing fast food to under the age of 18. This report is consistent with published WHO workplan to end childhood obesity. This implementation plan included tackling the marketing of unhealthy foods and non-alcoholic beverages to children. The Commission advised to adopt, and implement effective measures, such as legislation or regulation, to restrict the marketing of foods and non-alcoholic beverages to children and thereby reduce the exposure of children and adolescents to such marketing.

Marketing to Kids (M2K) is a key issue in Canada too. On May 1, 2018, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health proposed to reduce the age of restriction to under age 13 (from under age 17). Final regulations are expected to be released in June.

Source: WHO Executive Board 140th session, Steve Hawkes, Deputy Political Editor The SUN(UK)

Sodium Content in Many Processed Foods Still Too High

Different Kinds Of Salts In Spoons

Did you know that 77% of the sodium in our diet comes from processed food? According to Health Canada, 80% of Canadians are eating too much sodium which can lead to hypertension, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. While sodium has been recognized as a public health issue for over a decade now, food manufacturers have been working to lower the sodium content of processed foods by the end of 2016 using Health Canada’s voluntary sodium reduction targets. Were their efforts good enough?

Background: In 2012, Health Canada published interim sodium targets (known as Phase I, Phase II and Phase III targets) for various categories of food. Food manufacturers had until the end of 2016 to reduce the sodium content of their foods to meet these target levels. This three phase approach was designed to encourage gradual sodium reductions while still maintaining product safety, quality and consumer acceptance of the food’s taste. The goal of these targets was to lower Canadians’ sodium intakes from 3,400 mg/day to under 2,300 mg/day without requiring consumers to actively choose lower sodium foods.

Evaluation Results: Last year, Health Canada evaluated the food industry’s efforts to meet these sodium reduction targets and recently reported the findings:
– 28% of food categories met Phase I sodium reduction targets (e.g. breads, crackers, hot instant cereals, canned vegetables and legumes)
– 10% of food categories met Phase II reduction targets (e.g. cookies, ready-to-eat cereals, vegetable juices)
– 14% of food categories met Phase III sodium reduction targets (e.g. cottage cheese, bacon bits, tomato paste, toddler mixed dishes)
– 48% of food categories did not make any progress in sodium reduction (e.g. dry cured and fermented deli meats, refrigerated and frozen appetizers and entrées, frozen potatoes).

2018 02 - sodium reduction results pie chart 4

Recommendations & Next Steps:
This evaluation report show that modest sodium reductions have been made in most categories of processed foods. While these reductions will still help Canadians consume less sodium, the results were overall disappointing to Health Canada. Voluntary targets may not be strong enough to reduce sodium in our food supply. A more structured voluntary approach may be needed. Other options include a regular sodium-monitoring program and public reduction commitments by manufacturers.

Health Canada plans to conduct an in-depth analysis of each food category and meet with industry stakeholders and scientific expert to better understand the challenges around food safety, shelf life and functional roles faced during efforts to reduce sodium.

With the proposed new front of pack labelling regulations, packaged foods high in sodium, sugars, and / or saturated fat will be identified with a specific icon or symbol. This new regulation will up the pressure for further sodium reductions in food. Sodium will also be a key consideration when Health Canada introduces new regulations to restrict the marketing of unhealthy food and beverages to kids.

Are you ready to reduce the sodium content of your products? Would you like to share your sodium reduction success story with consumers and media? We can help. Contact us at info@nutritionfornonnutritionists.com.

NEW Front of Pack Labelling Update – 3 tips on how you can prepare for the big changes ahead.

N4nn fop labelling nov 2017
Photo Credit: Health Canada

  1. WHAT?
    Front-of-Package Nutrition Labelling update is out – read it here!

Health Canada just published the future of Front-of-Package (FOP) nutrition labelling based on proceedings from Sept. 18, 2017 Stakeholder Engagement Meeting. The document’s summary and subsequent social media comments from scientists and regulators signal big changes for food makers.  Although ‘no firm decisions were reached and re-designed symbols would be subjected to further consultations,…Health Canada concluded that a mandatory ‘high in’ front-of-package labelling system is the most appropriate to use’.  Front-of-Package examples included warning symbols implemented in other countries such as Chile and Ecuador. Are you ready for something like this?

N4NN 2017 fop graphic

  1. SO WHAT?
    Consider if your packaged foods may have to show warning labels on front-of-package.

The ‘high in’ Front-of-Package label approach may require a black and white warning label on pack in the future but consumers already have a tool to focus on the 3 nutrients of public health concern in the NEW nutrition facts table (NFT). Have you considered what the % Daily Value (% DV) for sugars, sodium and saturated fat tells about foods? The NFT footnote explains the % DV as this:  5% or less is a little, 15% or more is a lot. The new FOP will make sure that the negative attributes of food products are represented to help Canadians make informed food choices. Health Canada recognizes that there is a gap in labelling between packaged foods and those sold in in grocery or restaurants.  Future work with provincial and territorial counterparts will aim to find the best way to provide nutrition information in restaurants and other food service establishments.

  1. NOW WHAT?
    Speak to a Registered Dietitian with food labelling expertise to plan your strategies.

Health Canada says ‘discussion is very important in moving this forward and we need to get it right’. We agree and encourage you to connect with Registered Dietitians who are regulated professionals accountable to the public based on the highest standards of science and ethics.  Our influence runs deep and we look beyond the fads and gimmicks to deliver reliable advice that supports healthy living for all Canadians.

Contact us to help you meet the demands of rethinking food labelling and to guide your team in unlocking food’s nutrition potential.

 

Health Canada Bans Main Source of Trans Fats in Foods

Trans-Fats

Trans fats. They’re the worse type of fat because they pose a double whammy to your heart health – not only do they increase the bad “LDL” (Low Density Lipoprotein” cholesterol, but they also decrease the good “HDL” (High Density Lipoprotein” cholesterol. Eating trans fats increases the risk of heart disease.

While some foods contain small amounts of naturally occurring trans fats, the real concern is with foods containing “artificial” or “industrially produced” trans fat. The main source of this type of trans fat is partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs) which are oils that have been created during a process called hydrogenation. This process changes the structure of liquid oils into a solid at room temperature. PHOs extend the shelf life of foods and are typically found in commercially baked goods (e.g. pastries, donuts, muffins), deep fried foods, French fries, hard margarine, lard, shortening, frosting, coffee whiteners, some crackers and microwave popcorn. When you see the words “partially hydrogenated oils” in the ingredients list, you know that the food contains trans fats.

While the food industry has been voluntarily removing trans fats from products over the years, many foods still contain trans fats. On September 15, 2017, Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor announced a ban on PHOs from all foods sold in Canada, including foods prepared in restaurants, “Eliminating the main source of industrially produced trans fats from the food supply is a major accomplishment and a strong new measure that will help to protect the health of Canadians.”

The ban will come into effect on September 15, 2018.

[Photo credit: NewHealthAdvisor.com]

Health Canada Consultations – Let your voice be heard ( EXTENDED Aug 14)

Now is THE time to let your voice be heard about food, nutrition, way of eating and sustainability! We know this comes just before summer vacations, but consider that the policies formed following these three consultations will influence how Canadians hear about food, nutrition and sustainability for years to come.

Health Canada chose Dietitians of Canada annual conference on June 9th to announce the latest federal food and nutrition consultations. As part of the Healthy Eating Strategy, there are 3 public consultations live/on-line now and more are expected in the Fall. Please contact us if you have any questions about what this means to you and your business.

Here is a bird’s eye view of what the consultations are about. We encourage you to let your voice be heard and complete these surveys that will help shape the future of nutrition in Canada.

Canada’s Food Guide Consultation (Phase 2)

Food guide cropped consult'n banner N4NN June 2017

Health Canada is revising Canada’s Food Guide to strengthen its recommendations for healthy eating. This is the second round of consultations that is built on what the government heard from 20,000 Canadians who responded to the first round of consultations in 2016.  If you are using healthy eating recommendations for yourself and others you care about, or to help others through your work, we encourage you to complete the survey and join the discussion. This is your chance to weigh in on key issues related to healthy eating and provide input on the new healthy eating recommendations.

http://www.foodguideconsultation.ca/ EXTENDED till Aug 14, 2017.

Marketing to Kids

No ads to kids N4NN June 2017
Image Source Health Canada
Health Canada wants to reduce how much advertising children see or hear about unhealthy food and beverages. “This is a complicated subject so before action can be taken, some questions need to be answered, such as what we mean by unhealthy food and what kind of advertising should be allowed. Your ideas and opinions will help Health Canada decide how to go about restricting advertising for unhealthy food and beverages to children. This consultation document is available online between June 10 and Aug 14, 2017.”[1]

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/programs/consultation-restricting-unhealthy-food-and-beverage-marketing-to-children.html

[1] Health Canada (2017) Restricting unhealthy food and beverage marketing to children

Canada’s Food Policy

Food Policy N4NN newsletter June 2017

Food matters to Canadians. We “make choices every day about food that directly impacts our health, environment, and communities.” Agriculture Canada would like to help put more affordable, safe, healthy, food on tables across the country, while protecting the environment. This policy will cover the entire food system and you may have heard of the concept as ‘Farm to Fork’. An online survey is now open at www.canada.ca/food-policy and we encourage you to share your views that will help shape Canada’s food policy. Online consultations is open until July 27, 2017

 

New Nutrition Labels are Coming!

nutrition-labels-old-vs-new-bigger

After two years of public consultations, Health Canada has finalized the changes to the Nutrition Facts table and ingredients list on packaged foods. On December 14th, 2016, the Honourable Jane Philpott, Minister of Health announced that these changes are all part of the strategy to help make healthy food choices the easy choice for all Canadians.

Here’s a quick at-a-glance comparison of the old versus the new Nutrition Facts table as well as Ingredients lists.

The new Nutrition Facts table places a greater emphasis on calories, potassium, calcium and iron. For the first time ever, total sugars will have a % Daily Value (%DV) set at 100 grams:

nutrition-labels-old-vs-new-bigger


All food colours will now be listed by their name rather than collectively listed as “colours”:

ingreds-list-new


Different types of sugars will still be individually identified, and will now also be grouped together as “Sugars”:

ingreds-list-sugars

The food industry has 5 years (until 2021) to make these changes, but you may start seeing new labels as early as next year.

Contact us at: Info@NutritionForNonNutritionists.com for more information about these label changes and to discuss how the proposed regulatory changes to front-of-package labelling will impact your business.

New food guide consultations are open!

food-guide-consultationYou may have heard the big announcement that Health Canada is revising the Food Guide (CFG) and consultations are open for only 45 days until December 8th.  The last time CFG was changed was over 10 years ago so don’t miss this chance to let your voice be heard!

Why is CFG important?

CFG was, and will remain a key document that shapes the approach to healthy eating recommendations and policies in Canada, including nutrition education and menu planning. You know that nutrition science has evolved in the last 13 years.  We moved from ‘no fat’ or ‘low fat’ to good fat, from ‘low carb’ to high quality carbs, and at the end of the day more and more scientists agree that the overall dietary pattern is more important than any one food or nutrient. Of course, it’s a real challenge to translate complex science about nutrition into specific recommendations that meets the diverse needs of the Canadian population, but the new Food Guide revision set out to do just that. Let your voice be heard on how CFG can help you benefit from nutrition.

How to let your voice be heard!

We completed Canada’s Food Guide Workbook on line, which did not take very long, and we have a few tips for your consideration so you know what to expect when you participate.

The first question separates members of the general public from professionals who work in health, teaching or are representing an organization.  After a few more qualifying questions about who you are, the survey asks you to select 3 types of activities where you use healthy eating recommendations most often. The next set of questions are based on the 3 activities you just identified. They explore the type of guidance you find most valuable and the ways you would like recommendations presented. The final questions request you to rate the importance of a variety of topics related to healthy eating, including food enjoyment, eating patterns, security, environment, level of processing and sugars.

We encourage you to take the time and complete Canada’s Food Guide Workbook by December 8th. It’s your chance to influence the way Canadians will eat well for many years to come.

If you have any questions or comments on completing Canada’s Food Guide Workbook we’d be happy to hear from you!

Health Canada announces three new health claims

Health pic from Sue June 1, 2016

In May 2016, Health Canada announced three new health claims:

1. EPA & DHA and blood Triglyceride Lowering

2. & 3. Polysaccharide Complex (Glucomannan, Xanthan Gum, Sodium Alginate) and Blood Cholesterol Lowering and Reduction of the Post-Prandial Blood Glucose Response

Foods containing the healthy fats EPA and DHA (0.5 g combined) may now carry a new health claim stating their potential triglyceride-lowering benefits. For example, a permitted claim might read, “85 g (1/2 cup) of canned pink salmon supplies 40% of the daily amount of omega-3 EPA and DHA shown to help lower triglycerides.”

Aside from that primary statement, appropriate products can also carry the additional statement “EPA and DHA help reduce/lower triglycerides,” Read the detailed info here.

The food ingredient that is the subject of two new health claims is a soluble and viscous dietary fibre (polysaccharide complex of glucomannan, xanthan gum, sodium alginate) sold under the brand name PGX® (PolyGlycopleX®). Researchers studied the carbohydrate quality of foods with PGX using the glycemic response, glycemic index. The benefits of added fibre in the form of PGX helped help lower blood cholesterol and moderate the blood sugar rise after a meal. Sample claim: “The consumption of the 5 g of PGX® provided with 1 cup (30 g) of cereal helps reduce blood glucose rise after a meal containing carbohydrates.”
The summary of assessment is available online.

Please feel free to contact us with your questions on food labelling and claims.

Let your voice be heard! Help shape Canada’s new food labels

Health Canada recently announced proposed new changes to the Nutrition Facts table and ingredients lists with the goal of improving nutrition information on food labels. We encourage you to you consider the proposed changes and voice your opinion to Health Canada through their 10 question on-online survey and/or technical consultation before September 11th, 2014.

Some of the key proposed changes include:

  • listing Calories in a bigger and bold font
  • using consistent serving sizes on similar foods
  • increasing the Daily Value for fat and calcium, and decreasing the Daily Value for sodium
  • removing the % Daily Value for fibre and total carbohydrates
  • adding information about added sugars by including a % Daily Value for sugars as well as showing the amount of added sugars in the product
  • removing vitamins A and C, but adding potassium and vitamin D to the label
  • grouping nutrients that we should limit (fat, sodium and sugar) at the top half of the label
  • grouping nutrients that we need to get enough of (fibre, vitamins, minerals) at the bottom half of the label.

The consultation period is now open, and all consumers and stakeholders are invited to provide input on the proposed changes. We strongly urge you to let your voice be heard and share your feedback in shaping this important national nutrition labelling regulation.

Health Canada has developed three consumer fact sheets about Ÿ Serving Sizes, ŸNutrition Facts table and Ingredient List and  Sugar Content.  Consumers can provide their feedback through a 10 question online survey.

For food and health professionals, there is also a series of five technical consultation documents which explain the rationale for the proposed changes: Ÿ Format Requirements, ŸCore Nutrients, ŸDaily Values (%DV), ŸReference Amounts and Ÿ Serving Sizes. You are also invited to provide feedback to each of these consultation documents.

All comments must be submitted to Health Canada by September 11, 2015. Please contact us for assistance in reviewing the proposed changes, providing feedback to the consultation, and discussing how these changes may impact your products’ nutrition claims.

Advances in Carbohydrates and Fibre in Nutrition Conference, Canadian Nutrient Society (CNS) – January 11, 2014

On January 11th, 2014 we attended the one-day CNS conference on Advances in Carbohydrates and Fibre in Nutrition at the Hyatt Regency in Toronto. The event drew over 250 attendees including nutrition professionals, dietitians and students with expert updates on functional fibres, claims in Canada and Glycemic Index of foods.

Dr. Joanne Slavin presented the growing importance of fibre’s beneficial role in health related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, body weight and satiety, digestive health including microbiota. Fibre is a nutrient of concern because few people consume the recommended daily amounts. As you may know, Health Canada has a New Fibre Policy as of 2012.  The important news on fibre is that there are many fibres with known beneficial health effects, but they are not all equally effective, and may act differently when isolated from intact plant structure. The debate on the way to communicate information about Glycemic Index (GI) continues in Canada. Dr. William Yan discussed Health Canada’s published position on the use of the GI claims on food labels as published in the 2013 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The important concept reinforced by the world renowned speakers Drs. David Jenkins and Thomas Wolever was that GI is an easily misunderstood concept. GI is a measure of carbohydrate quality in a food, and is not an index for glycemic/insulin response in a person. Furthermore glycemic/insulin response in people is determined by the glycemic index of the food and the amount of food eaten. Thus a lower GI food could have a higher glycemic response depending on how much of the food is consumed. It’s certainly a complex topic! Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about carbohydrate nutrition including fibre and glycemic index.